Tag Archives: net neutrality

Day Of Action To Save Network Neutrality July 12

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For years, we’ve told you why network neutrality is the key principle underlying an Open Internet and protecting the web’s capacity to connect. Finally it seemed as if the future of the Internet was no longer in question when the FCC moved to Title 2 classification.

But as with so many things, the Trump administration is leaving no stone unturned in trying to dismantle social progress and the open Internet is now on the chopping block.

Continue reading Day Of Action To Save Network Neutrality July 12

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Road Trip

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Posted by Tracy Rosenberg on April 20 2010

MA teamed with the LA Media Reform group to travel down to Orange County and the Inland Empire and speak to Dems who aren’t supporting net neutrality.

Using the 3rd Annual LA Media Justice Summit as our organizing platform, a week later on April 6th, a team of intrepid media reformers went out to visit Representative Joe Baca- San Bernardino and Representative Loretta Sanchez-Garden Grove to say net neutrality now.

The visits were good conversations and left us hopeful that our Internet future may be bright.

If we’ve inspired *you* to pay a visit to your representatives and make sure they are on board with net neutrality: here’s a handy guide to legislative visits:

Legislative-Visits

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Be Careful What You Wish For

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Posted by Tracy Rosenberg on
Huffington Post  December 24, 2010

Sometimes you might get it.

For most of the past year, public interest groups worried about the future of the Internet have pushed for action on net neutrality by the Federal Communications Commission. In response to that call, Chairman Julius Genachowski moved in the spring to reclassify broadband services, proposing a light regulatory protocol as a “third way”.

After that didn’t exactly take off, the chair convened meetings with industry including AT&T, Skype, Verizon and Google, meetings that broke down after Google and Verizon announced a deal that would introduce paid content prioritization. In the ensuing uproar, the issue once again rose to the level of a burning public debate with right-wing accusations of “Obamacare for the Internet” competing with public interest laments about slow lanes on the Internet to come for alternative news, independent artists and musicians, and community groups. Continue reading Be Careful What You Wish For

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The Compact with Capitalism: Wheeler’s Net Neutrality Dodge

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Posted by Tracy Rosenberg on May 24th, 2014
Huffington Post

Rhetoric and reality sometimes diverge. Right now, the future of the Internet is hooked like a fish between two different paths.

On December 16, 2013, I met FCC chairman Tom Wheeler at an Oakland town hall meeting, and I used my two minutes to talk about reclassification, a term that means making whole the regulatory split that is going to create a two-tiered Internet. The chairman nodded, took notes, and at the end of the presentation mentioned the importance of a “network compact”.

I had just finished reading “Net Effects; The Past, Present and Future Impact Of Our Networks” by FCC chairman Tom Wheeler. Perhaps surprisingly for someone so upset by Wheeler’s proposals that if I lived closer to DC I’d have been camping in front of the FCC, I agreed with much of what Wheeler wrote. Continue reading The Compact with Capitalism: Wheeler’s Net Neutrality Dodge

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Without Net Neutrality, How Are Oakland’s Communities Affected?

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Posted by Jean Lee on June 27th, 2014
Oakland Local

Viewing an episode of your favorite show may become a matter of speed, fast or slow. Trying to watch that season finale of Game of Thrones or that premiere of Orange is the New Black could become an experience based on how much you’re willing to pay.

The way we watch our shows online, or anything online, for that matter, could face some significant changes under the Federal Communications Commission’s new proposal. In May, the FCC voted 3-2 to proceed with Chairman Tom Wheeler’s proposed “Open Internet,” which would essentially allow for Internet Service Providers to prioritize certain sites like Netflix and YouTube, and charge users premium fees for accessing them at a faster pace.

Continue reading Without Net Neutrality, How Are Oakland’s Communities Affected?

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